Food Porn: Seabar (Revisited)

When I started Buffalo Eats in February 2009, I had no idea what I was doing. I had never attempted writing a restaurant review (or even really read them for that matter) and there were so many foods that I hadn’t tried. But over the last three years and 300+ restaurants, I’ve gotten better at writing (aka Alli edits our posts) and I’ve made my way through many delicious cuisines. When we wrote our first post about Seabar in March 2009 it was not only one of our first posts ever, it was the first time Alli and I really tried sushi.

We’ve been back to Seabar a lot since then, but never got the chance to re-write our initial review. A lot has changed with both Seabar and ourselves since that 2009 post. During that time the restaurant was primarily a sushi bar and only had about ten tables. Since then they have not only expanded their menu but also the actual restaurant. There is plenty of seating, a kitchen, a really nice bar and both sushi and non-sushi options. A couple weeks ago, Alli and I decided it was time for an update. Our meal was delicious, as to be expected, and reaffirmed to both Alli and myself that Seabar is one of Buffalo’s best restaurants and one of our favorite places to eat.

Quick Info:

Seabar is still primarily a sushi restaurant and while we went crazy on raw fish on our first visit, on this recent trip we decided to order some of their more elaborate/non traditional sushi rolls and try something from the kitchen. We ordered the Miso Caramel Crab Roll (above, $11) and their Lobster Roll ($14). Both were fantastic but for completely opposite reasons. The Lobster Roll had avocado, cucumber and large pieces of lobster in a soy wrap. The flavors in the roll were fresh, clean and light, I probably could have eaten two rolls myself. The Miso Caramel Crab Roll was a different but equally as good experience. This sushi roll is tempura fried and filled with crab, caramel, mushroom and cream cheese topped with a thick caramel sauce. Still warm and with a nice outer crunch from the tempura, the combination of salty caramel sauce and cream cheese was heaven. This is one of Alli’s favorite dishes and it isn’t hard to agree with her. I highly recommend it but you may want to go light on the rest of your meal when you order it.

Since they put in the kitchen and started offering a new menu, I’ve been dying to try Bourdain’s Last Meal (above, $17) . This three course dish is actually an appetizer, offering Pork Belly, Foie Gras Torchon and Bone Marrow on one plate. It was our first time trying bone marrow and while I had only heard great things from my fellow foodie friends, I wasn’t so sure what to expect. It lived up to the hype and was pretty much the best butter I’ve ever had in my entire life. Honestly, that best way to describe it is “meat flavored butter.” The foie gras was rich and creamy, a little too intense for Alli but I gladly devoured the rest. Chef Mike Andrzejewski does not shy away from the use of foie gras and proudly serves it about Seabar and Mike A’s (the Fxxk California Burger he has over there is amazing). I may be wrong, but I believe his foie gras comes from Hudson Valley, which is a cage-free farm. If you are more interested in learning about/trying foie gras, I highly suggest you check out the next IN this coming Monday (Sept 24th). The pork belly was equally as good and like the marrow, melted in my mouth with each bite. You can never go wrong with pork belly (that should have been my yearbook quote). While the dish is meant to be shared with another diner, I could have happily eaten this myself.

We’ve been fortunate enough to get to know Chef Mike over the last year; he’s been gracious enough to record a podcast in our dining room and I was able to enjoy private tasting of Mike A’s (still the best meal of 2012, by far) thanks to his generosity. Mike came over to our table during our meal and brought us one of their specials; a fig that was filled with a little foie gras, deep fried and served with slices of serrano ham. The best part was that the whole thing was drizzled with a sauce made from the reduction of fat from the Serrano ham (pictured above, top). As Alli and I like to say, it was stupid. The sauce was sweet and delicious; the flavor and texture combination of fig, crunchy breading and warm foie gras was incredible. The slices of ham were salty and thin enough to melt in your mouth, which put the dish over the top. If this shows up on the menu again, make sure you order it.

I’m glad Alli and I went back to Seabar, it was ridiculous that we waited so long to update our review. I can’t say enough good things about the place, the food is delicious and sourced with the highest quality ingredients around and the vibe of the restaurant/bar is incredibly hip but comfortable. It’s truly a restaurant that has something for everyone, even for people who think they don’t like sushi (you’re crazy) will be able to find something on their kitchen menu that they will love. Just make sure you make reservations early because we are clearly not the only people who love Seabar, it’s always packed, and rightfully so.

Seabar on Urbanspoon

One thought on “Food Porn: Seabar (Revisited)

  1. Scott

    My girlfriend and I went there last week. One of the specials they had that night was a “Smoked Salmon ‘Bacon'” which was made from the belly of a salmon. It was one of the best things I have ever put in my mouth. The entire dinner was spectacular. The service was excellent as well. Seabar is an amazing restaurant. Mike A should be very proud of what he does there.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes:

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>